Indian affairs and the Indian Reorganization Act the twenty year record

Cover of: Indian affairs and the Indian Reorganization Act |

Published by University of Arizona in Tucson, Ariz .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • United States,
  • Indians of North America -- Government relations -- 1934-,
  • Indians of North America -- Politics and government,
  • Indians of North America -- Legal status, laws, etc.

Edition Notes

Microfiche. Honolulu : Law Library Microform Consortium, 1990. 1 microfiche : negative. (Nat. Amer. leg. mat. coll. ; title 2290).

Book details

Statementfrom a symposium held in conjunction with the fifty second annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association, Tucson, Arizona, December 30, 1953 ; edited by William H. Kelly.
SeriesNative American legal materials collection -- title 2290.
ContributionsKelly, William H. 1902-, American Anthropological Association., University of Arizona.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationv, 39 leaves
Number of Pages39
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17743747M
OCLC/WorldCa29919263

Download Indian affairs and the Indian Reorganization Act

Indian Reorganization Act | United States [ Book/Printed Material Native Hawaiian Government Reorganization Act: hearing before the Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, One Hundred Eleventh Congress, first session, August 6, Download Citation | The Indian reorganization act and Indian self-government | There is a widespread view in Indian Country that the Indian Reorganization Act of set back self-government for.

Thus the Indian Reorganization Act of was proposed to reorganize Indian tribes as federal corpora­tions. With the passage of the act the Bureau of Indian Affairs field employees promptly. In spite of strenuous objections by Christian missionary groups, Congress passed the Indian Reorganization Act (IRA, also known as the Wheeler-Howard Act) in Treuer writes that between the passage of the Dawes Act, inand the Indian Reorganization Act ofwhich restored the right to self-governance, an estimated ninety-five per cent of land.

The Indian Reorganization Act restored some economic and cultural autonomy back to Native Americans and also “helped to modernize reservations and return some disputed [Indian] land.” In.

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